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1st-generation entrepreneurs – Premji, Nilekani, NRN – make Bengaluru India’s philanthropy capital

Ecosystem Building | Dec 1, 2017

With four Bengalureans being the only Indian signatories to Bill Gates’ Giving Pledge, the IT city could very well be the philanthropy capital of the country. Representatives of India Inc here adopt fresh approaches to humanitarianism — from closely-monitored capacity building in existing nonprofits to promoting tech-led scalable market solutions for development issues. Additionally, younger good samaritans are creating a new culture of giving that is inspired by, yet distinctive, from what their role models initiated.

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